Living Anxiously: My Story

Untitled

Ugh. Anxiety. Am I right?

It seems to be the topic popping up everywhere and so many of those near and dear to me experience it regularly–myself included.

I have been away from this blog for nearly a year and a half, my entire pregnancy and life of my new little boy. With my first baby, postpartum depression hounded me for nearly three years. I still struggle with it. I was so nervous about getting it again that I went to weekly therapy sessions and practiced mindfulness and meditation as often as I thought of it. It helped tremendously. Depression is dark and terrifying. It kept me chained to my bed most of the time and when not my bed, my house, because I was too lethargic to do anything else. I thank God every day that the same lonely darkness did not come back after the birth of this new joy in my life.

One thing that did come, however, was severe anxiety. I don’t often write so personally online. I try to avoid it, but as I’ve struggled and learned new skills, I have felt this tug to share and maybe help someone else or, at the very least, experience some kind of catharsis through writing about it.

Beginning a few months after my baby’s birth, I developed crippling anxiety for no reason that I could understand. My chest would fill with painful flutters with usually no triggers. It was like I was surrounded by fire, but everything around me was happy and bright and normal. I went from depression to anxiety, from darkness to fire. Neither pleasant, neither something I wanted to have in my life, and I found myself retreating again. It’s what I do when things get too hard, I find my sanctuary, my bed. The same one I’ve had since I was fifteen. And I disappear. I disappear into television shows and don’t come back until I am forced to.

The funny thing about coming out of a depression (I’m not totally out yet, but have made so many strides) is that I find myself wanting to take care of myself more. It’s not funny, really. Just really, really amazing. I am discovering what I value and it’s real and genuine and worthwhile. Because I wanted to take care of myself, I decided to take an anti-depressant which would also help with my anxiety. I started it in January. After three weeks, I was starting to feel pretty good. Until I wasn’t.

The fire around me turned into fierce, blue flames and attacked constantly. Even a funny show that had me laughing out loud would quickly turn my laughter into a full-blown hyperventilating panic attack. I lived on the edge of life-halting anxiety for another month before finally deciding to wean off, which was a difficult process too. I have had difficulties with three other anti-depressants in my life, and my therapist and I have concluded that maybe my chemical makeup does not handle SSRIs well. Maybe. That is not the point of this blog post, especially because so many people do so well on them, and I am so happy for anyone who has found peace, medicated or not.

After spending so much of the last four years crippled with depression, I was determined not to go back, not to let this be an excuse to crawl back into my bed again and not live. During this time, I upped my therapy sessions and started reading. Reading like crazy. I want to share some of the things I’ve learned here and include some of my favorite, most helpful books with reviews eventually. I am going to sum it up in four categories, making this a five-part series.

  1. Storms will come, but they will pass too. 

  2. Define my values. 

  3. Mindfulness and practice. 

  4. Living Slowly

There is so much more to learn. So much more to discover. And so much life left to live. I will release each post every other day for the next four days. If anyone does read this, please comment with what has helped you in your own struggles and let’s learn from each other.

I also hope if anyone reading this needs help, is struggling, and can’t find hope, that they will look for it, really look for it, because no matter the weather, hope is there. If you are really struggling and don’t know how to go on, please seek help. Go to your doctor, call a close friend, call the national suicide hotline (1-800-273-8255), do something. You are worth it. Life is beautiful on the other side, I promise. Even a very small, very simple life can be a very satisfying, romantic one. You are not alone. I promise that too.

Advertisements